Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Deanna O'Donnell on "What is Glass Bead Disease?: A study of the Fort Union Trade Bead Collection"

Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 6pm, John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center, Macalester College

Glass Bead Disease is an irreversible, degradation process that leaves the surface of the glass with microfractures, pitting, and a white ‘crust’. The number of studies that have explored the cause of glass disease in beads over the past five decades is small.  Conservators have observed acceleration in the degradation for beads attached to corrosive natural materials. Blue beads are especially susceptible, suggesting the colorant plays a role in the process.  Fort Union Trading Post has a unique collection of Native American glass trade beads, both in its size and history.  The beads have not been used, so their condition can be attributed to natural weathering.  In July 2015, 81 beads from the Fort Union collection were analyzed by optical microscopy and portable X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy.  The majority of the beads were blue hollow cane beads that varied in condition.  This pilot study aimed to identify chemical trends within the glass composition that were correlated to condition to potentially identify a chemical fingerprint conservators and curators could use to predict vulnerable glass artifacts. In this talk, Dr. O’Donnell will present their preliminary findings.



About the speaker: 
Deanna O’Donnell is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Hamline, where she teaches Analytical Chemistry and Instrumental Methods.  She began her scientific career at McMaster University in Canada receiving her BS degree in Chemistry. She earned her PhD from the University of Notre Dame in Physical Chemistry where she studied aqueous radicals using Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Spectroscopy. Dr. O’Donnell continued her training in a joint postdoctoral appointment at City College of New York and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Her post-doctoral work focused on developing Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy as a nondestructive method to analyze molecular dyes found in cultural heritage objects and controlled substances in forensic evidence. During her post-doc, she was also an adjunct instructor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice teaching General Chemistry. At Hamline, Dr. O’Donnell has continued to develop analytical methods for the analysis of small molecules relevant to the fields of forensic sciences and cultural heritage.


https://sites.google.com/site/deannaodonnellhu/

*Location and parking information can be found here (#29 on the printable map at the bottom of the link)

Saturday, November 19, 2016

Katherine Erdman on "Enticing the Gods of Ancient Gaul: Iron Age and Gallo-Roman Ritual Offerings Deposited in Springs "

Thursday, December 8, 2016 at 6pm, John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center, Macalester College


Chatillon-sur-Seine - Source de la Douix
Tossing a coin into a fountain for luck is a tradition with roots in the ancient world. Throughout European prehistory, people visited different types of watery places, such as bogs, rivers, and springs, to deposit a variety of objects, not just coins, as offerings to their gods. Focusing on a series of springs in the Burgundy region of modern day France, we will explore the offerings deposited there by Iron Age and Gallo-Roman Period inhabitants and the impact the Roman conquest had on indigenous ritual practices in ancient Gaul.

GR.2.003 999.7.1
About the speaker: https://umn.academia.edu/KatherineErdman














*Location and parking information can be found here (#29 on the printable map at the bottom of the link)

Monday, October 17, 2016

Pearce Paul Creasman on "Maritime History & Archaeology of Ancient Egypt"

Saturday, November 12, 2016 at 11am, Pillsbury Auditorium at the Minneapolis Institute of Art

++ All AIA-MN events at Mia remain free but require advance tickets++
call 612-870-6323 or reserve online 

Temple of Philae
Most often associated with desert sands and pyramids, ancient Egyptian culture arose from the Nile and depended upon the river and neighboring seas. The enormous wealth and power of the pharaohs was made possible only by the “superhighway” of the Nile. The stones that built the royal monuments, the Nubian gold that flowed into the treasury, and the armies that expelled foreign rulers all traveled by boat. As Egyptian concerns did not end with the Nile, neither did its naval reach. Egyptian fleets sailed the Red Sea and the Mediterranean in search of exotic cargos, and foreign ships moored at Egyptian harbors, creating an international tapestry of Bronze Age and Iron Age trade.

Pearce Paul Creasman
With their longstanding and necessary reliance on the Nile, oases, and seas, it should come as no surprise that the ancient inhabitants of Egypt regularly incorporated the life-sustaining waters in their material and spiritual worlds. Indeed, ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman ingenuity often circumvented natural geological barriers, resulting in the redirection of these bodies of water, if only partial or temporary (e.g., for irrigation, military transport). Diverse archaeological and historical investigations of maritime interaction during Egypt’s ancient periods abound and this presentation provides a brief history and review of the field of study (discussing topics as diverse as early dynastic [ca. 3000 BCE] boat burials found on land at Abydos, Ramesside [ca. 1200 BCE] tax levies on imported ship cargoes, and underwater excavations of the Ptolemaic [ca. 300 BC] harbor at Alexandria) and identifies possible avenues for future work.

About the speaker: Dr. Pearce Paul Creasman is associate professor of Egyptology & dendrochronology, curator of the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at the University of Arizona. He is also director of the University of Arizona Egyptian Expedition. His research interests include the study human and environment interactions, maritime archaeology, dendroarchaeology, and Egyptian archaeology. He is the author of numerous journal publications and edited volumes, including Ancient Mediterranean Interconnections: Papers in Honor of Nanno Marinatos, co-edited with R.H. Wilkinson. More information is on his website: http://creasman.imrd.org/

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

A Look at Cultural Heritage Preservation in Honor of International Archaeology Day

Saturday, October 15, 2016 at 11am, Janet Wallace Fine Arts Commons, Macalester College

11am lecture:
Sudharshan Seneviratne on 
"Cultural Heritage Preservation in Sri Lanka"

12-2pm: Student Poster reception (with refreshments!)




Sudharshan Seneviratne, recipient of the 2013 AIA Award for Best Practice in Conservation and Heritage Management, will speak about “Cultural Heritage Preservation in Sri Lanka” at 11am. Professor Seneviratne’s talk will be followed from 12-2pm by a reception and presentation of Student Posters related to archaeology and preservation.

++ please note that this event is in the the Janet Wallace Fine Arts Center and Parking is available in any of the Macalester lots.

About the speaker: https://www.archaeological.org/sudharshanseneviratne%E2%80%942013conservationandheritagemanagementaward


Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Students! Share your work on Archaeology Day!

International Archaeology Day is coming up on October 15 and we will once again celebrate with a talk about cultural heritage preservation and student poster session. students, please consider presenting a poster on Recent Fieldwork and Research Projects Related to Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Preservation. The call for posters is here and abstracts are due September 25. This is a great way to share your work and build your CV/resume while having fun and learning what other interesting projects MN students are working on!

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Bret Jackson and Richard Graff, “Time Travel is Possible: Computational Tools to Support Experiential Analysis of Oratorical Venues in Ancient Greece"


Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 6pm, John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center, Macalester College


The Pnyx site in Athens is of enormous historical importance; it is widely regarded as the birthplace of democracy, but despite decades of intensive study, many fundamental features of the site remain in dispute. How many audience members could attend meetings and what would it feel like to speak to 6,000 audience members (a quorum) or more? What demands does the structure itself make on the speaker to be seen, heard, and understood, and on auditors to see, hear, and understand? We will discuss a digital liberal arts collaboration between computer scientists and a scholar of Greek rhetoric pioneering the use of virtual reality and computational tools for experiential analysis of oratorical performance venues.


Dr. Graff’s current research considers the theories of prose style presented in the rhetorical treatises of ancient Greece and Rome.  He is especially interested in the ways early theories of style reflect or respond to circumstances of oratorical performance and textual production in classical antiquity.  His articles on this subject have appeared in Rhetorica, Rhetoric Society Quarterly, and Advances in the History of Rhetoric.  He has also published essays on evolving historiographies of rhetoric and on the rhetorical theory of Chaim Perelman, and is co-editor of The Viability of the Rhetorical Tradition.

He is a past president of the American Society for the History of Rhetoric (ASHR) and serves as referee for several journals in rhetorical studies. He has held a University of Minnesota McKnight Summer Research Fellowship and been a visiting Senior Associate Member of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, Greece. Dr. Graff is an Associate Professor in the Department of Writing Studies and teaches graduate courses and seminars in Classical Rhetoric, Modern Rhetorical Theory, and Rhetorical Stylistics. He is recipient of the College of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences’ (now CFANS) Distinguished Teaching Award.
http://www.tc.umn.edu/~graff013/

Professor Jackson studies 3D human-computer interaction and data visualization. His research investigates how to interact with spatial data more effectively using new computer interfaces, such as virtual reality. In his free time, he plays water polo and enjoys canoeing and hiking.


*Location and parking information can be found here (#29 on the printable map at the bottom of the link)

AIA members may join the speaker for a no-host meal following the talk.

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

2016-17 Event Schedule

Here is our schedule of 2016-17 AIA-MN events - please check back for additions!


Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 6pm: Bret Jackson and Richard Graff, “Time Travel is Possible: Computational Tools to Support Experiential Analysis of Oratorical Venues in Ancient Greece," in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center, Macalester College

Saturday, October 15, 2016 at 11am: A Look at Cultural Heritage Preservation in Honor of International Archaeology Day: Sudharshan Seneviratne, recipient of the 2013 AIA Award for Best Practice in Conservation and Heritage Management, will speak about “Cultural Heritage Preservation in Sri Lanka” at 11am. Professor Seneviratne’s talk will be followed from 12-2pm by a reception and presentation of Student Posters related to related to archaeology and preservation. In Fine Arts Commons, Macalester College
- -- look for a call for posters in September!

Saturday, November 12, 2016 at 11am: Pearce Paul Creasman, “Maritime History & Archaeology of Ancient Egypt,” in the Pillsbury Auditorium at the Minneapolis Institute of Art (note: all AIA-MN events at Mia remain free but require advance tickets and tickets for this talk will be available after October 1)


Thursday, December 8, 2016 at 6pm: Katherine Erdman, "Enticing the Gods of Ancient Gaul: Iron Age and Gallo-Roman Ritual Offerings Deposited in Springs," in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center, Macalester College

Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 6pm: Deanna O’Donnell, "What is Glass Bead Disease?: A study of the Fort Union Trade Bead Collection," in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center, Macalester College

Saturday, April 1, 2017 at 11am: Lothar von Falkenhausen, “Trying to Do the Right Thing to Protect the World’s Cultural Heritage: One Committee Member’s Tale,” in the Pillsbury Auditorium at the Minneapolis Institute of Art (note: all Mia events are free but require advance tickets)


Friday, April 28, 2017 at 6pmJoanne Pillsbury, “Palace into Temple: Architecture at Chan Chan, Peru,” at the University of St. Thomas.