Friday, January 18, 2019

Pearce Paul Creasman on "Excavations at a Forgotten Female Pharaoh’s Temple of Millions of Years”

Saturday, February 23, 2019 at 11am: Pearce Paul Creasman, “Excavations at a Forgotten Female Pharaoh’s Temple of Millions of Years,” in the Pillsbury Auditorium at the Minneapolis Institute of Art

++Please note: this is a free, but ticketed event. Register online or call 612.870.6323. Tickets available February 1++

Yeturow
Barque Nun raises the sun


Abstract:
From 2004 to 2016, the University of Arizona Egyptian Expedition has conducted excavations at the temple of millions of years of the 19th Dynasty (ca. 1190 BCE) female pharaoh Tausret in Western Thebes (modern Luxor, Egypt). The last ruling descendant of Ramesses the Great, Tausret was a remarkable woman and one of the very few in more than 3,000 years of Egyptian history to hold the throne alone. Indeed, Homer relays that she was king of Egypt when Troy fell. By combining a variety of investigative methods (e.g., excavation, remote sensing) this project has challenged the long held assumption that her primary monument was never completed. Archaeological evidence is presented for a functional and structurally complete temple, if not fully adorned, prior to its thorough destruction in the beginning of the 20th Dynasty by a new ruling family. Important inscriptions have also been found attesting that Tausret reigned for longer than is traditionally assigned. Furthermore, other archaeological evidence regarding temple activities and later uses of the site (through the 7th c.) are presented. 

About the speaker:
Pearce Paul Creasman, PhD, is associate professor of Egyptology & Dendrochronology and curator of the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at the University of Arizona. He is also director of the University of Arizona Egyptian Expedition. 

PLEASE NOTE:
There will not be an AIA member lunch after the talk, but there will be a special opportunity to hear more from our speaker and others about Egyptian archaeology and culture:


Study Day: Kings and Pharaohs in Ancient Egypt from the Mediterranean to Sudanese Nubia

Saturday, February 23, 2019, 1:30 pm to 4:30 pm, Mia Reception Hall

$40; $32 My Mia members (membership is free!!). Register online or call 612.870.6323

This event includes two talks, refreshments, and an opportunity to connect with experts in Egyptian art and culture.

Maritime History & Archaeology of Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egyptian culture arose from the “superhighway” of the Nile and neighboring seas. Egyptian fleets sailed the Red Sea and the Mediterranean in search of exotic cargos, and foreign ships moored at Egyptian harbors for trade. The ancient inhabitants of Egypt regularly incorporated life-sustaining waters in their material and spiritual worlds, and often circumvented geological barriers to redirect them for irrigation or military transport. This talk provides a brief review of ancient Egypt’s maritime interactions.

The Pyramid Field and Royal Cemetery of Nuri in Sudanese Nubia
Much of what today is The Republic of the Sudan was within Egypt’s sphere of influence during the pharaonic period. Virtually all of the New Kingdom pharaohs led expeditions to or built monuments in “Nubia.” Yet, the independent kings of ancient Sudan (the “Kushites”) reunified the lands of ancient Egypt as the 25th Dynasty, leading the empire into the Iron Age. In 2018, the University of Arizona Egyptian Expedition started excavations at Nuri, one of two royal cemeteries in Sudan and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Hear the story of the site and its builders.


Monday, December 3, 2018

Melissa Sellew on "The Buried Book: The Ethics of Discovery and Publication of Ancient Manuscripts"

Saturday, December 8, 2018 at 11am in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center at Macalester College (also #29 on this map).

+++Please also note that it is fine to park in any of the campus lots+++

Ancientlives.org
In recent years various books from ancient times that were thought to be forever lost have been discovered in Egypt and neighboring countries. In this talk we will feature some of the more interesting finds, such as the apocryphal Gospel of Judas and unknown poems of Sappho. We will focus on the ethical challenges facing scholars as these texts appear on the open market without reliable information about the circumstances of their discovery and acquisition, in defiance of AIA policies regarding acquisition or publication of unprovenanced artefacts.

More about professor Sellew is here

AIA members may join Professor Sellew for a no-host lunch at Pad Thai on Grand after the talk


This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the Macalester Anthropology department and the Archaeological Institute of America




Friday, October 12, 2018

Archaeology and Drones: Student Research of a Roman Villa and its Environment in Croatia



Added event in honor of International Archaeology Day:
Archaeology and Drones: Student Research of a Roman Villa and its Environment in Croatia
Friday, October 19, 2018, 3:15 pm, Anderson Student Center, Room 233, University of St. Thomas (#27 on this map)



The Croatian-American interdisciplinary project of documenting and excavating a Roman maritime villa site on St. Klement Island started in 2007. New this summer was the application of drone technology in recording the excavation process and relating features of human presence to the environment. 


Two UST students of geography, Alice Ready and Emma Rinn, the recipients of the Sustainability Scholars Grant and the Young Scholars Grant respectively, collected photo and special data in the field. In collaboration with Dr. Paul Lorah, Alice produced a series of map layers depicting contemporary and ancient landscapes. Emma sequentially recorded the excavation process and created 3D models of the multi-period site. They will present their methods and results in illustrated presentations, posters and in Q&A session.


Drones, as Emma says, accurately and efficiently collect photo and special data, creating data paths and gaining unique perspectives. She sequentially recorded the excavation process and then analyzed the drone-acquired imagery and data in ESRI’s ArcGIS Pro/Scene software to create 3D models of the multi-period site. Alice used the drone to generate a study area of the villa site and acquired high resolution georeferenced images. In collaboration with Dr. Paul Lorah and through ArcPro OrthoMapping she processed an orthomosaic and digital elevation model depicting the landscape. By masking out vegetation and extracting edges of built features, indication of human presence, she demonstrated effectiveness of drones in highlighting areas of potential archaeological significance.



Co-sponsored by the following departments and programs at the University of St. Thomas:
Geography and Environmental Studies, History, Office of Sustainability Initiatives, Sustainability Scholars Grant Program, Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program and the College of Arts and Sciences 

Pay parking is available in the Anderson Parking Facility (#71 on the map)


Thursday, August 30, 2018

Vanessa Rousseau on "King Tut: The Life and Afterlife of the King"

Thursday, September 20 , 2018 at 6pm in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center at Macalester College (also #29 on this map).

This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the Macalester College Anthropology department and the Archaeological Institute of America

Image: Harry Burton (c) The Griffith Institute, Oxford. Colorized by Dynamichrome




King Tut: The Life and Afterlife of the King


A minor king became the most famous pharaoh in history due to the happenstance of preservation and his tomb full of “wonderful things” has fueled the popular imagination for nearly a century. We will explore what this burial reveals about the man, his moment in ancient Egyptian history, and modern Egyptomania. We will also consider what new theories and scientific advances suggest and what questions have yet to be resolved.

Vanessa Rousseau is an independent art historian, curator and archaeologist with special interests in cross-cultural exchange and looting and the antiquities trade. She also works on interdisciplinary object authentication, teaches at a number of Twin Cities universities, works with the Archaeological Exploration of Sardis in Turkey, serves as president of the Minnesota chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America and is an Adjunct Curator and Antiquities Consultant for the Weisman Art Museum. 

AIA members may join the speaker for a no-host meal following the lecture at Pad Thai Grand Restaurant, 1681 Grand Avenue, St. Paul

Thursday, August 16, 2018

AIA-MN 2018-19 lecture schedule


AIA-MN 2018-19 lectures 
(as always, all official events are free and open to the public)
---Please also note that The Maya Society has a great calendar of events and Franck Goddio will speak at Mia in Oct/Nov in conjunction with the Sunken Cities exhibit.

Thursday, September 20 , 2018 at 6pm: Vanessa Rousseau, "King Tut: The life and Afterlife of the Boy King," in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center at Macalester College (also #29 on this map).
This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the Anthropology Department 

Saturday, December 8, 2018 at 11am: Melissa Sellew, "Title TBD – Manuscript Discoveries from Egypt," in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center at Macalester College (also #29 on this map).
This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the Macalester Anthropology Department  

Saturday, February 23, 2019 at 11am: Pearce Paul Creasman, “Excavations at a Forgotten Female Pharaoh’s Temple of Millions of Years,” in the Pillsbury Auditorium at the Minneapolis Institute of Art
This event is free and open to the public, but all Mia talks are now ticketed - call 612-870-6323 
++++++ Also stay tuned for additional special events with Pearce Paul Creasman at Mia!

Thursday, March 14, 2019 at 6pm: Kat Hayes, "Title TBD - heritage in conflict and Fort Snelling archaeology," in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center at Macalester College (also #29 on this map).
This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the  Macalester Anthropology Department 

Saturday, April 13, 2019 at 11am: Matthew Harpster, “Using Old Data to Recreate a New Past: the Ancient Maritime Dynamics Project,” in the Pillsbury Auditorium at the Minneapolis Institute of Art
This event is free and open to the public, but all Mia talks are now ticketed - call 612-870-6323




Thursday, March 15, 2018

David Mather on "Zooarchaeology of Historic Fort Snelling and the Native Ecology of Bdote"

Thursday, April 5, 2018 at 6pm in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center, Macalester College 
(an interactive map is here, and the Campus Center is #29 on this map)


This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the Anthropology Department and the Archaeological Institute of America, http://aiamn.blogspot.com/

Passenger Pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) Skulls from the Fort Snelling Officers' Latrine, 1841-1846

David Mather
National Register Archaeologist
Minnesota State Historic Preservation Office

Animal remains from Fort Snelling provide detailed information about the native ecology of the Twin Cities metropolitan area before it was irrevocably changed by urbanization. This is a case study of the Officers’ Latrine feature, with dated deposits ranging from 1824 to 1865. The assemblage is incredibly well preserved, and includes a significant variety of wild bird remains. These and other animal species reveal aspects of the original upland prairie, floodplain forest and aquatic habitats at the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers, an area known as Bdote to the eastern Dakota. Zooarchaeological data are presented in the contexts of historical records, current ecological conditions, and the vast, largely unanalyzed faunal assemblages from significant sites in the vicinity of the confluence. The Officers’ Latrine represents a small subset of the total faunal assemblage from Fort Snelling, and the first to be studied in detail.

David Mather has been active in Minnesota archaeology for thirty years. He has been the National Register Archaeologist for Minnesota's State Historic Preservation Office since 2006, and before that served as the consulting archaeologist for the Mille Lacs Tribal Historic Preservation Office. He has a M.S. in Environmental Archaeology from the University of Sheffield in England, and is finishing his PhD on the archaeobiology of bear ceremonialism at the University of Minnesota. David is currently directing a multi-year project to update the National Register of Historic Places documentation for the Fort Snelling Historic District.

AIA members may join the speaker for a no-host meal following the talk.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

John Hale on "Treasures of Caesarea Maritima"


Saturday, March 3, 2018 at 11am in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center, Macalester College (an interactive map is here, and the Campus Center is #29 on this map)


This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the Macalester College Anthropology Department and the Archaeological Institute of America




Figurine of the moon goddess Luna
(Photo: Ran Feinstein)

The head of a bronze statue of the sun god Sol
(Photo: Ran Feinstein)





TREASURES OF CAESAREA MARITIMA
Dr. John R. Hale, University of Louisville

Two thousand years ago, Caesar Augustus sent Roman engineers to construct a gigantic artificial harbor for his ally, King Herod the Great of Judea.  That great harbor, called Caesarea Maritima, became an important center for both government and commerce in the eastern Mediterranean.  At Caesarea, St Paul embarked on his historic voyage to Rome, and Charlemagne established a hostel for Frankish pilgrims.  In the immense Roman breakwaters constructed of hydraulic “pozzolana” concrete, divers have revealed 2000-year-old remains of the wooden caissons used during construction.  Two important shipwrecks have recently been discovered near the harbor.  One carried a cargo of Fatimid gold coins from Egypt, and the other a shipment of Roman bronze statues.  Dr. John R. Hale, an underwater archaeologist at the University of Louisville, will present an overview of these extraordinary finds, and describe his own participation in the scientific work of recovering and documenting the artifacts. 

Dr. John R. Hale is the director of the Liberal Studies Project at the University of Louisville. An underwater archaeologist and expert on maritime history, he is the author of Lords of the Sea, on the ancient Athenian navy, among numerous other works. He has carried out archaeological fieldwork at sites around the world, and has for the past several years been involved in the underwater excavation of King Herod's harbor at Caesarea Maritima in Israel. 


++ The talk will be followed by a small reception for AIA members and students.++

An event pdf is available here