Thursday, August 30, 2018

Vanessa Rousseau on "King Tut: The Life and Afterlife of the King"

Thursday, September 20 , 2018 at 6pm in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center at Macalester College (also #29 on this map).

This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the Macalester College Anthropology department and the Archaeological Institute of America

Image: Harry Burton (c) The Griffith Institute, Oxford. Colorized by Dynamichrome




King Tut: The Life and Afterlife of the King


A minor king became the most famous pharaoh in history due to the happenstance of preservation and his tomb full of “wonderful things” has fueled the popular imagination for nearly a century. We will explore what this burial reveals about the man, his moment in ancient Egyptian history, and modern Egyptomania. We will also consider what new theories and scientific advances suggest and what questions have yet to be resolved.

Vanessa Rousseau is an independent art historian, curator and archaeologist with special interests in cross-cultural exchange and looting and the antiquities trade. She also works on interdisciplinary object authentication, teaches at a number of Twin Cities universities, works with the Archaeological Exploration of Sardis in Turkey, serves as president of the Minnesota chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America and is an Adjunct Curator and Antiquities Consultant for the Weisman Art Museum. 

AIA members may join the speaker for a no-host meal following the lecture at Pad Thai Grand Restaurant, 1681 Grand Avenue, St. Paul

Thursday, August 16, 2018

AIA-MN 2018-19 lecture schedule


AIA-MN 2018-19 lectures 
(as always, all official events are free and open to the public)
---Please also note that The Maya Society has a great calendar of events and Franck Goddio will speak at Mia in Oct/Nov in conjunction with the Sunken Cities exhibit.

Thursday, September 20 , 2018 at 6pm: Vanessa Rousseau, "King Tut: The life and Afterlife of the Boy King," in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center at Macalester College (also #29 on this map).
This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the Anthropology Department 

Saturday, December 8, 2018 at 11am: Melissa Sellew, "Title TBD – Manuscript Discoveries from Egypt," in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center at Macalester College (also #29 on this map).
This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the Macalester Anthropology Department  

Saturday, February 23, 2019 at 11am: Pearce Paul Creasman, “Excavations at a Forgotten Female Pharaoh’s Temple of Millions of Years,” in the Pillsbury Auditorium at the Minneapolis Institute of Art
This event is free and open to the public, but all Mia talks are now ticketed - call 612-870-6323 
++++++ Also stay tuned for additional special events with Pearce Paul Creasman at Mia!

Thursday, March 14, 2019 at 6pm: Kat Hayes, "Title TBD - heritage in conflict and Fort Snelling archaeology," in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center at Macalester College (also #29 on this map).
This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the  Macalester Anthropology Department 

Saturday, April 13, 2019 at 11am: Matthew Harpster, “Using Old Data to Recreate a New Past: the Ancient Maritime Dynamics Project,” in the Pillsbury Auditorium at the Minneapolis Institute of Art
This event is free and open to the public, but all Mia talks are now ticketed - call 612-870-6323




Thursday, March 15, 2018

David Mather on "Zooarchaeology of Historic Fort Snelling and the Native Ecology of Bdote"

Thursday, April 5, 2018 at 6pm in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center, Macalester College 
(an interactive map is here, and the Campus Center is #29 on this map)


This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the Anthropology Department and the Archaeological Institute of America, http://aiamn.blogspot.com/

Passenger Pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) Skulls from the Fort Snelling Officers' Latrine, 1841-1846

David Mather
National Register Archaeologist
Minnesota State Historic Preservation Office

Animal remains from Fort Snelling provide detailed information about the native ecology of the Twin Cities metropolitan area before it was irrevocably changed by urbanization. This is a case study of the Officers’ Latrine feature, with dated deposits ranging from 1824 to 1865. The assemblage is incredibly well preserved, and includes a significant variety of wild bird remains. These and other animal species reveal aspects of the original upland prairie, floodplain forest and aquatic habitats at the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers, an area known as Bdote to the eastern Dakota. Zooarchaeological data are presented in the contexts of historical records, current ecological conditions, and the vast, largely unanalyzed faunal assemblages from significant sites in the vicinity of the confluence. The Officers’ Latrine represents a small subset of the total faunal assemblage from Fort Snelling, and the first to be studied in detail.

David Mather has been active in Minnesota archaeology for thirty years. He has been the National Register Archaeologist for Minnesota's State Historic Preservation Office since 2006, and before that served as the consulting archaeologist for the Mille Lacs Tribal Historic Preservation Office. He has a M.S. in Environmental Archaeology from the University of Sheffield in England, and is finishing his PhD on the archaeobiology of bear ceremonialism at the University of Minnesota. David is currently directing a multi-year project to update the National Register of Historic Places documentation for the Fort Snelling Historic District.

AIA members may join the speaker for a no-host meal following the talk.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

John Hale on "Treasures of Caesarea Maritima"


Saturday, March 3, 2018 at 11am in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center, Macalester College (an interactive map is here, and the Campus Center is #29 on this map)


This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the Macalester College Anthropology Department and the Archaeological Institute of America




Figurine of the moon goddess Luna
(Photo: Ran Feinstein)

The head of a bronze statue of the sun god Sol
(Photo: Ran Feinstein)





TREASURES OF CAESAREA MARITIMA
Dr. John R. Hale, University of Louisville

Two thousand years ago, Caesar Augustus sent Roman engineers to construct a gigantic artificial harbor for his ally, King Herod the Great of Judea.  That great harbor, called Caesarea Maritima, became an important center for both government and commerce in the eastern Mediterranean.  At Caesarea, St Paul embarked on his historic voyage to Rome, and Charlemagne established a hostel for Frankish pilgrims.  In the immense Roman breakwaters constructed of hydraulic “pozzolana” concrete, divers have revealed 2000-year-old remains of the wooden caissons used during construction.  Two important shipwrecks have recently been discovered near the harbor.  One carried a cargo of Fatimid gold coins from Egypt, and the other a shipment of Roman bronze statues.  Dr. John R. Hale, an underwater archaeologist at the University of Louisville, will present an overview of these extraordinary finds, and describe his own participation in the scientific work of recovering and documenting the artifacts. 

Dr. John R. Hale is the director of the Liberal Studies Project at the University of Louisville. An underwater archaeologist and expert on maritime history, he is the author of Lords of the Sea, on the ancient Athenian navy, among numerous other works. He has carried out archaeological fieldwork at sites around the world, and has for the past several years been involved in the underwater excavation of King Herod's harbor at Caesarea Maritima in Israel. 


++ The talk will be followed by a small reception for AIA members and students.++

An event pdf is available here











Friday, December 1, 2017

Forum on Looted Art, Archaeology and Restitution: the Napoleon & Al Mahdi Cases


Thursday, December 7, 2017 at 6pm,  in the Hearth Room (room 340), Anderson Student Center, University of St. Thomas (#27 on this map). Pay parking is available in the Anderson Parking Facility (#71 on the map)


The entrance into Paris of the works destined for the Musée Napoléon, detail from a Sevres vase by Antoine Beranger, 1813. http://hadrian6.tumblr.com




Mausoleum caretaker prays at a damaged tomb in Timbuktu, Mali.
(AP Photo/Baba Ahmed, File) https://
www.timesofisrael.com    

Discussion led by Vanessa Rousseau, President, Archaeological Institute of America, MN Society and 
Mark Stansbury-O’Donnell, Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Art History, University of St. Thomas



The (new!) AIA members' forum is designed to give local society members and students the opportunity to participate in meaningful conversations about archaeological issues and give feedback to the national AIA. This inaugural event will compare two cases of legal restitution or reparation in the aftermath of looting and the destruction of cultural property: The return of objects confiscated by Napoleon, and the recent International Criminal Court conviction of Ahmad Al Mahdi for destruction of Muslim shrines in Timbuktu. Short preparatory readings are available here

This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the Dean of Arts and Sciences and the Art History Department at the University of St. Thomas and the Archaeological Institute of America    




Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Marcia Regan on "Death and Reverence in Prehistoric America: The Evidence From the River Hills Site"


Thursday, November 9, 2017 at 6pm: Marcia Regan, “Death and Reverence in Prehistoric America: The Evidence From the River Hills Site," in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center, Macalester College


The Minnesota River. By Andercee at the English language Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, 
https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3008286 



Marcia Regan
Dept. of Anthropology, Hamline University 


The River Hills site, located in northern Dakota County, MN, preserved the remains of several individuals who had evidence of extreme interpersonal violence. The analysis of the remains paints a picture of violent death but compassionate burial. The juxtaposition of these two events helps us recreate events happening within a short span of time 2,000 years ago along the Minnesota River.

AIA members may join the speaker for a no-host meal after the talk. 

This event is free and open to the public; co-sponsored by the Anthropology Department and the Archaeological Institute of America, http://aiamn.blogspot.com/


Monday, September 18, 2017

Anne Austin on “Embodying the Goddess: Revealing the practice of tattooing in ancient Egypt”

Saturday, October 14, 2017 at 11am, Pillsbury Auditorium at the Minneapolis Institute of Art

++ Free but all Mia talks are now ticketed++AVAILABLE AUGUST  25++
call 612-870-6323 or visit:


Anne Austin/Stanford University
While tattooing is an increasingly popular topic, it is rarely discussed in the past owing to the infrequent identification of tattoos in human remains. This is particularly true in dynastic Egypt, where physical evidence of tattooing was limited to a set of three female Middle Kingdom mummies from Deir el-Bahri with Nubian geometric patterns placed on their arms and abdomens. During the 2014-2015 mission of the Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale at Deir el-Medina, however, our team identified the mummy of a woman with over thirty separate, figural tattoos placed along her arms, neck, and shoulders. These tattoos offer our only evidence of Pharaonic tattooing to date and provide us an unusual glimpse into the world of tattooing and worship in daily life.

This talk reviews the significance of this tattooed mummy from Deir el-Medina through a systematic analysis of the placement, orientation, order, and symbolism of her tattoos. These tattoos created a permanent and public association of this woman with worship of the goddess Hathor, even allowing her body to be used as a potential vehicle for the goddess herself through the repeated motif of the divine Wadjet eyes. This mummy therefore not only offers a unique and significant contribution to our understanding of the practice of tattooing in ancient Egypt, but also the potential roles of women in religious worship in ancient Egypt.

This 4-minute video made by documentary filmmakers Jean-François Dars and Ann Papillault offers a great introduction to this tattooed mummy: http://llx.fr/site/egyptian-tattoos/.  

About the speaker: